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Brendan Prawdzik, , PhD

Brendan Prawdzik , PhD

Assistant Teaching Professor of English

310 Burrowes Building
State College , PA 16801
Email:
Office Phone: (510) 684-8211

Office Hours:

  • Fall 2018:

Curriculum Vitae

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Education

  1. PhD, University of California-Berkeley, 2009
  2. BA, Rutgers University, 2001
  3. Roberta Holloway Postdoctoral Fellow (poetics), University of California-Berkeley, 2010-11
  4. Ahmanson-Getty Postdoctoral Fellow (theology and media), UCLA, 2009-10
  5. Rotary International Ambassadorial Scholar, The University of St. Andrews, 2001-02

Professional Bio

Dr. Prawdzik specializes in early modern literature.

His book Theatrical Milton: Politics and Poetics of the Staged Body (Edinburgh University Press, April 2017) explores the presence of theatrical rhetoric and structures in Milton and early modern culture. A paperback version will appear in November 2018 through EUP.

His article, "'Til Eyes and Tears Be the Same Things: Marvell's Spirituality and the Senses of History," was awarded the Albert W. Fields Award for the best article published in Explorations in Renaissance Culture in 2015. His article, "Naked Writhing Flesh: Rhetorical Authority, Theatrical Recursion, and Milton's Poetics of the Viewed Body" appears in With Wandering Steps: Generative Ambiguity in Milton's Poetics. His chapter on Aristotle's Poetics and Milton's Samson Agonistes will appear shortly in Closet Drama: History, Theory, and Genre, ed. Catherine Burroughs (Routledge). His article, "Greenwashing Marvell," is immediately forthcoming in a special issue of Marvell Studies focused on "Marvell and Theory."

He is developing several additional projects: on secret bird-hunting scenes in Shakespeare and Marvell; on Milton in Hawthorne and the early American imagination; and on the writings of John Bulwer and the epistemological crisis of 1642-53, a span that includes all of Bulwer's works

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Prawdzik has published several works in additional venues on John Milton, Andrew Marvell, and early modern culture. He is writing on a second book titled, A Time to Weep: Historical Loss, Temporality, and Material Systems in British Literatures of Nature, 1633-88.  He has taught at the University of California-Berkeley, The University of the Pacific, and Christian Brothers University and has been at Penn State since Fall, 2015.