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Jonathan P. Eburne

Jonathan P. Eburne

Professor of Comparative Literature, English, and French and Francophone Studies
Preferred Pronouns: he, him
455 Burrowes Building
(814) 863-0968

Mailroom: 430 Burrowes Building

Jonathan P. Eburne

Fall 2021 Office Hours

Spring 2021: M 10 am –11:30 am (zoom) T/R 11 am- 12:30 pm (office) and by appointment

Curriculum Vitae

Education

University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory (2002)
Dartmouth College, A.B. in High Honors English and French, Magna Cum Laude (1993)

Professional Bio

Jonathan P. Eburne is Editor-in-Chief of ASAP/Journal, the scholarly journal of ASAP: The Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/asap_journal/); he is also editor of the "Refiguring Modernism" book series at the Pennsylvania University Press. He is the author of Outsider Theory: Intellectual Histories of Unorthodox Ideas (University of Minnesota Press, 2018) and Surrealism and the Art of Crime (Cornell University Press, 2008) and the co-editor of four additional books: Leonora Carrington and the International Avant-Garde (2017), The Year's Work in Nerds, Wonks, and Neocons (2017), The Year's Work in the Oddball Archive (2016), and Paris, Capital of the Black Atlantic (2013). He has also edited or co-edited special issues of Modern Fiction Studies, New Literary History, African American Review, Comparative Literature Studies, Criticism, and ASAP/Journal. Eburne is founder and acting President of ISSS: The International Society for the Study of Surrealism; President of the Association for the Study of Dada and Surrealism; and in 2015 was President of ASAP: The Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present.

Eburne's teaching and scholarly interests include international avant-garde movements, twentieth- and twenty-first century literature and the arts, and literary and cultural theory.

Areas of Specialization

Visual Culture

Avant-Garde Movements, Surrealism and Dada, Film, Pulp Fiction